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get the message
(sumner, marr)

i always thought of you as my brick wall

built like an angel, six feet tall

six feet tall



and when you go away i start to weep

you’re too expensive, girl to keep

isn’t it sweet
napalm
i don’t know where to begin, living in sin

how can you talk? look where you’ve been

i’ve counted the nights of living in sin

how can you talk? look where you’ve been



take my independent point of view

i loosen up my wallet, thanks to you

don’t do me any favours



hark the herald angel’s sting

please repair my broken wing

why won’t you look at me?

i live and breathe



i don’t know where to begin, living in sin

how can you talk? look where you’ve been

i’ve counted the nights of living in sin

how can you talk? look where you’ve been



i don’t know where to begin, living in sin

how can you talk? look where you’ve been

i’ve counted the nights of living in sin

how can you talk? look where you’ve been



living on peanuts ain’t my scene

a shame that word rhymes with mean

versions
album edit (3:54)

album version (5:18)

dna groove mix (5:27)

dna groove mix (edit) (3:42)

dna sin mix (5:25)

dna sin mix (edit) (3:58)

single mix (4:05)

releases
get the message
electronic
electronic/disappointed
electronic (remastered)
for you
get the message: the best of
electronic (special edition)

comment
the unified intent of marr and sumner was announced in april 1991 by the striking guitar introduction on this, their second single a-side: it justified the hype surrounding the release of the first album and paved the way for its success with a top 10 position in the uk. johnny’s outstanding music is matched by bernard’s acerbic words on what remains their best known song, honoured by smiths and joy division champion john peel when he included it in his annual festive top 50.

bernard sumner: “johnny wrote the music first, then owen morris played me the start. i got a lyric straight away, then he played me the next four bars, and we just went through it like that. we never did another take. i sang every line directly after i wrote it. you can hear the song being written as you listen to it.” johnny marr: “my favourite electronic song is get the message. [it’s] a very elementary song but the atmosphere of the vocal is superb. it’s not just about the content of the lyric, it’s also about the delivery.”

it remains the best example of their original concept of blending the emotive synthesisers of new order with the rich guitar sound of the smiths; the last minute is particularly stirring as denise johnson adds her most memorable vocal on an electronic song, marr’s guitar groans and contorts over the ominous keyboards, and sumner’s iconic words conclude with a casual parting shot that surpasses new order’s vanishing point. an instant classic.

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